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Playing the Sympathy Card

March 4, 2009

Alright, it’s time for another secret confession…I am an American Idol addict. I’ve been watching this thing ever since we gained access to the networks (not an easy task with satellite until a few years ago) and it’s my guilty pleasure. I love Simon’s incisive rudeness, Randy’s yo-dawg-ness, and Paula’s which-village-lost-their-sweet-but-blithering-idiot-ness. I’m still deciding what Kara’s “ness” is, mainly because I think she’s still deciding herself.

 

Last night prompted an interesting discussion between the husband (who also watches but will never admit to actually liking AI) and me about the whole sympathy card thing. We have two prime candidates this year: the man who lost his wife and the blind dude. (Danny Gokey and Scott Macintyre) Well, actually we have three if you count Lil Rounds, but I don’t actually remember what her sympathy card is, so I’m thinking it’s not a good play compared to the other two. Maybe you can help us sort it out with some votes.

 

Personally, I think the tragedy of a man in his thirties losing his equally youthful wife to…what was it? The details are fuzzy, but I think it was cancer—is much more tragic than being simply blind. Duane disagrees. Let’s lay it all out here. First, the bereaved.

 

You’re newlywed. Your whole life—together—is stretching out ahead of you. You’re madly, passionately in love, because, let’s face it, you haven’t gotten tired of each other yet. You’re looking ahead to such things as babies, buying your first home and maybe your first “real” car, celebrating such things as getting your college debts paid off. This is the one you’ve been waiting for, it seems, since you started dating in high school. This is what it’s all about. And then, before it’s really begun, you’re back to square one, alone…only this time, you have the memories of what you started and couldn’t realize to fruition. (Probably along with some debt, because what newlyweds are thinking about mortality and purchasing life insurance?)

 

To me, that’s sad. Verra, verra sad.

 

Moving on the blind dude.  I don’t know how he became blind, but he seems to handle himself very well. In fact, he doesn’t seem to view his impairment as an impairment…he’s just…differently-abled. It certainly doesn’t seem to impact his voice at all. I’m not sure I see the tragedy in this. Sure, I wouldn’t want to be blind (or deaf, or dumb, for that matter), but I think of it this way: if I had a choice between my husband being blind and being dead, which one would I choose?

 

Umm…no brainer.

 

(I’ll answer that for those of you who are screaming, “she’s not saying ‘blindness!’ She’s not saying it!” Of course I’d prefer he’d be blind.)

 

So, in your opinion, which one wins the sympathy card vote?

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